Strength & Speed


"If you want something you never had, you have to be willing to do something you have never done."

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All articles are written by S&S owner Evan Perperis unless otherwise noted. 

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OCR America 2: My Most Impressive Ultra-OCR Feat

Posted by Strength & Speed on October 10, 2020 at 12:45 PM


To the outsider my list of Ultra-OCR charity events may seem like a blur and equally as hard across the board. Is the 24 hour treadmill OCR (1 mile run + 4 obstacles repeated for 24 hours) hardest due to boredom? Is the 48 hour multi-lap of Conquer The Gauntlet hardest due to length of time? Is OCR America hardest because it was 7 days long and the first major charity event I ran? Or could it be the Ultra-OCR Grand Slam since I competed in 6x 24 hour OCRs in 365 days with different competition that were usually only racing in one 24 hour that year? I’m not sure which was hardest, but the most impressive one in my mind was OCR America 2: When Hell Freezes Over, an 8 day, 8 venue, multi-lap event where I ran a marathon length OCR every day for eight days in late January. Here’s why:


1. Flash to Bang: One of the hardest parts about doing these charity events is not only do you have to physically do them, but you are organizing and planning them too. I found out in late December work wasn’t going to let me travel to Kuwait for Hannibal Race, so I took an idea I had for 2021, OCR America 2, and pivoted it to 2020. On December 19th I made the decision, then proceeded to start emailing sponsors, contacting brands, calling venues, finding a pit crew, designing shirts, designing belt buckles, setting up online registration and everything else that goes into an event. A week later, on December 26th, I placed the order for the buckles (after several back and forth adjusting designs), ordered the shirts and made the first public teaser announcement. Four days later the announcement was public and on January 19th, one month post decision I began running.


2. Training? That’s overrated: After World’s Toughest Mudder (mid-November) I go into off-season mode where I stop running but continue to strength train. With the event a month away, I had time for a two week training block and a two week taper. Essentially I was relying on the last 20 years of my life and consistent fitness to perform on event day. I was equally worried about injury for such a sudden increase as I was about physically being able to run that much on what I would consider “no training.”


3. Best Performance: When you are the only athlete covering the distance it is hard to judge how well you are performing. In OCR America back in 2016, I did a lot of walking after day four. With OCR America I was still jogging at a decent pace on Day 6 (day 7 and 8 are a different story). However, the video from Michelle Warnky’s Movement Lab Ohio captures it well. Despite logging lots of miles and completing hundreds of obstacles, Amy Pajcic and I are playing around on obstacles like it’s a normal day at the ninja gym. Going into day 8 I had covered 191 miles, that’s over 27 miles a day for seven days. In 2016 I was only able to cover 161 miles and that was without having to deal with single digit temperatures and snow.


4. Arguably the Hardest Event: Finally, I think you could make an argument that this was my hardest event. While they all had their challenges, 8 venues, 8 days, 200 miles and 1000+ obstacles is a lot of wear and tear on the body. Add in that most people don’t like being outside at all in the winter but I was doing it for 8 days in a row for up to 12 hours a day. Actually, I thought 48 hours of Endure The Gauntlet was harder but that’s because I don’t like the heat, my hands were ripped to shreds along with swollen, my pit crew was pulling ticks off my legs every lap, I was covered in bug bites that itched for days and Conquer The Gauntlet’s obstacles felt like an ass kicking on every lap.

 


In the end, I performed above my expectations for OCR America 2: When Hell Freezes Over. This was largely due to a stellar pit crew. My dad, an experienced member of my pit crew, was there who knows me better than anyone but my wife and he handled a lot of the logistics. Strength & Speed’s Jacob Stone handled the driving and his conversations kept me amused while pacing me. Obstacle Running Adventure’s Mike Stefano produced, what I think is, the best OCR podcast content ever (listen to episodes 112-119), Stoke Shed’s Bobby Ross the filmmaker kept me motivated by pacing and producing daily videos that were the highlight of my day.


When you are being beaten down by the course day after day you certainly don’t feel tough. However, seeing Bobby’s videos every morning made me visualize an ideal version of myself….Ultra-OCR Man that allowed me to tap deeper into the mental grit bank. There were days I was limping all evening because my ankle was swollen. I would go to bed not knowing if I could continue the next day. I never externalized the feelings because I worried they would manifest themselves into reality. Instead I silently prayed, pushed it out of my mind and decided sleep would make it go away. It worked…kind of. Every day that passed my ankle would start hurting earlier and earlier in the day. From my now skewed memory I think on day 5 it was 18 miles, day 6 it was 14 miles, day 7 around 10 miles and by day 8 after only 6 miles I was in pain.


With 2020 being a slow race year it has allowed me time to reflect on my biggest event of the year and one of the best experiences of my life. That’s it for OCR America…or so I keep telling myself. Keep training and I hope to see you at 2021’s charity event, which is less than a day in length...thank goodness

 

No Substitutions

Posted by Strength & Speed on September 15, 2020 at 10:20 PM

There is no substitution for hard work. This phrase has been repeated so many times in history, I’m not sure anyone knows who said it first. Despite the overuse, it still is a phrase that I don’t always grasp. I like to find the fastest and easiest way to get something done. There’s no sense in wasting energy. This will sometimes get me into trouble, like it did the other week when I decided to run my first alternative marathon, with absolutely no training

 

If you aren’t familiar with the idea of an alternative marathon, it’s simply 26.2 miles completed in a unique fashion. In this case, the idea was to run a single mile every hour, for 24 hours (doubling up in two hours and adding a little for the 0.2 miles). For extra spice and an upper body workout, I added in ten pushups for every mile. Ideally, the mile and ten pushups would take roughly fifteen minutes, leaving me around forty five minutes to do chores and little tasks. That way, at the end of 24 hours, I would not only have done a marathon, but a dozen little tasks as well.

 

Marathons have always been a daunting idea, because I don’t like running. Before this event, I had never run more than three miles at once, and the most I had done in a day was thirteen miles. So the idea of just running 26.2 miles has never been appealing. But I like doing hard things and when I saw this crazy Australian, Beau Miles, doing a 24 hour alternative marathon, it caught my interest.


My big mistake came from not training or preparing at all. There was no running plan, no fueling strategy, nothing. But I was so confident I was going to breeze through this event. It was only a mile an hour, after all. I thought I could just trade practice for more time. Looking back, my confidence was more arrogant than anything, and I was about to be put in my place.

 

Sure enough, once the event started, it didn’t take long for things to start going down hill. It started with heat exhaustion and dehydration around mile five. This forced me to abandon the idea of doing chores in between each round and focus solely on recovery. After recovering a little, a blister started on my foot after mile six. Nothing duct tape couldn’t fix, but the wheels were falling off and I wasn’t even a third of the way done.

 

I managed to run a total of 10.2 miles on schedule. Then the night hit, and my ability to move was limited to a walk. At mile thirteen, the chafing set it. No amount of youtube videos could prepare me for that agony. After that, my walk turned into a waddle. I managed to get a total of 20.2 miles before I had to throw in the towel and admit to myself that I was not going to win.

 

Despite the failure, I’m still happy and proud with the attempt. I think I learned more in those eighteen hours than I have in years. I finally have an understanding for what no substitutions really means, and how to apply in the future. I also have a better understanding of my current limits. Now I can make a game plan to push past them. At the end of the day, I encourage everyone to do something crazy like an alternative marathon. You learn a lot about yourself and really do gain an appreciation for the work and effort that goes into becoming a better version of yourself.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Michael Giles is an engineer by day and an OCR weekend warrior. He has completed nine obstacle course races, including Conquer the Gauntlet, and the Spartan Trifecta. In the evenings, he trains at his local Crossfit gym, and enjoys rock climbing. In addition, he occasionally creates his own unique challenges to test himself.

 

New Death Race Book Now Available!

Posted by Strength & Speed on March 20, 2020 at 6:00 PM


There aren’t many Obstacle Course Racing (OCR) books and there are even fewer written by the athlete’s themselves that compete. So when I heard that Tony Matesi (muti-time death race participant) was writing a book called “Legend of Death Race” I was excited and had to get myself a copy.


The book is written from Tony’s perspective giving you a moment by moment account of the Death Race from 2012, 2013 and 2014. If you are unfamiliar with Death Race, it is a variable time event lasting up to around 60 hours long and requires athletes to complete a mix of challenges. The challenges are often insane requiring athletes to complete thousands of repetitions of calisthenics, walk far distances barefoot, do mountain repeats for time and carry heavy weights over rough terrain. As if that’s not bad enough challenges sometimes have a mix of mental challenges layered on top of the physical ones. Add in a mix of mind games, ambiguous rules and flexible solutions and to finish the event athletes need to be tough, strong and be willing to step into the gray area of the “rules”.


The Death Race has been talked about in the past in Spartan Up! By Joe DeSena as well as several times previously on the Strength & Speed podcast (see Ep 121 with Matt Hanson and Ep 54 with Christina Armstrong). Tony’s book is definitely the most in depth coverage of the events that is publicly available (and I’m not even at the end of the book yet).


The book officially released March 10th, 2020. I was fortunate enough to get an advanced copy that I’m currently working my way through. Look for the review next month on Mud Run Guide for a more detailed analysis and my thoughts on the book. If you are preparing for Death Race or similar type endurance events, you’re need a copy of the book as soon as possible. If you are looking for an interesting story written by someone who is pushing their limits then you’ll find this book interesting and perhaps can use his lessons learned to extend your own capability.

Now availble here: https://amzn.to/33aKAPC

 

All pictures from Tony Matesi's Facebook page.

5th S&S Development Team Window Now Open

Posted by Strength & Speed on November 22, 2019 at 4:55 PM


Strength & Speed is opening the application window for their 5th S&S Developtment Team. Each year has brought success to our athletes with a list of different benefits that change but also expand slightly every year. In the past the team has included accomplishments such as athletes getting their first sponsors, several becoming ambassadors for brands and many hitting new PRs including first Ultra-OCR win, first win, first cash podium, most podiums in a year and more. To check out some of the athletes from the last three years, check out the Teams page, under the Athletes tab.


Unlike Pro Teams which often provide larger benefits like free access into races spanning multiple states and other perks, the biggest benefit of this team is access to knowledge for improvement not published elsewhere. Upon entrance into the team you will have small group access to personal trainers, a nutritionist, physical therapist, OCR professionals and other sponsored athletes. As part of the Development Team, you will get unprecedented access to knowledge includes training information, workout templates and guidance when applying for sponsorship.


Additional benefits of the team include name/S&S score on the website, a couple of items of free apparel, marketing support, discounts not available to non-team members and the opportunity to expand you influence in the OCR world. As S&S gets perks they are allowed to share, those discounts, free items and free entries are passed along to the team.  In 2019 alone we gave away over $500 in race entries to team members.  Companies want athletes that not only provide them quality finishing results but also have an outlet for spreading their message. Being a part of Strength & Speed gives you an established platform to spread your desired message to a larger audience rather than trying to build something on your own from the ground up.


Getting sponsored by a larger company is not an easy task and it requires significant work. The athletes at Strength & Speed have already solved a lot of the challenges associated with this process. If you do not need training advice but just knowledge on how to get sponsored, the Development Team will also help you with that.



Apply today by filling out the information below and sending it to Evan@TeamStrengthSpeed.com as AN ATTACHED WORD DOCUMENT if you are interested. We are not necessarily looking for the best athletes, just those with a strong desire to succeed. Application window closes on January 15, 2020 and selectees will be notified during the first week of February 2020.:

(Cut and paste the below into a word document and fill out)



Name:


Is this your first year applying?:


Major Goal for 2020:


Minor Goals for 2020:


Races for 2020:


2019 Race Results:


Race Highlights from 2018 or Earlier:


Social Media Sites (Facebook/Twitter/Instagram/YouTube/etc.):


Other Relevant Information You Think We Should Know:


Other Sponsors (if applicable):


Possible Interests in Expanding Influence (interested in writing articles, reviews, videos or other ideas?):


(Reference Criteria section of the website for below information. Proof of score not required at the time of applying.)


Strength Score:


Speed Score:

Gear Review: Goodr Sunglasses

Posted by Strength & Speed on August 26, 2019 at 11:55 AM


Two years ago I had never heard of Goodr sunglasses when I came across them stocked in a local running store. A year ago I didn’t know anyone that owned them until my podcast cohost Brenna “Red Beast” Calvert started buying pairs like she had stock in the company. Well after her constantly talking about them, I finally picked up a pair for a review. Here is what I thought of Goodr and if they live up to all the hype:


Style and Color: What caught my attention initially was their wide range of styles and fun names associated with each. As an Obstacle Course Racer (OCR), you’ll be able to find a pair that matches your favorite race series or team without issue. “This Is Sparta!!!! (it’s not)” is perfect for all the Spartan Sprint enthusiasts, “Falcor’s Fever Dream” or “Cryo-Crypt” are perfect for all the Savage Racers out there and the orange “Donkey Goggles” is great for all the Tough Mudder Legionnaires, just to name a few.


My former teammate used to get a haircut before every race because according to him when he looks good, he feels good and when he feels good, he races better. I’m less concerned about my hair, but I do agree with him on looking and feeling good to race better. Goodr gives you more color options than seem reasonable. In fact, you are probably going to have trouble just picking one color.


I went with “Gangrene Runner’s Toes” green to match my Conquer The Gauntlet Pro Team jersey, the red/black Mud Run Guide exclusive variant to match my #TeamAtomik race kit and “Swedish Meatball Hangover” to celebrate my two recent podium finishes at the 12 hour Toughest Mudder events. (The yellow/blue of those glasses match the leader’s bib, kind of like cyclists do at the Tour De France when they win a colored jersey.)


Fit: The glasses fit great on my head. For those with big heads or just like bigger glasses, Beast Goodr are their larger variants. I’ve been wearing them daily for my training runs and even at a couple of non-timed OCRs. They stay put without issue and I experienced no slipping making them perfect for wear as an athlete. In fact, most of the time I forgot I was even wearing sunglasses, which is the ultimate sign they fit and perform well.


Price: Here’s where most sunglasses companies lose my interest. They charge $100 or more for something I’ve been known to lose within the year. Goodr comes in at an extremely reasonable $25 for most pairs. This means I can buy a pair, or several, wear them for things like running or racing and not worry if I end up losing them.


Brand: Goodr markets itself as what I would describe as a “fun brand”. Their sunglasses are not only great but their marketing team ties them into a lifestyle that scream PARTY with fun names like “Whiskey Shots with Satan”, “Flamingos on a Booze Cruise” and “Kiss Me I’m S***faced”.

That’s not me. Not even close. I don’t drink anymore because I’m so fitness focused and there was a running joke at my job I “don’t like fun.”

      Coworkers: “Hey Evan, we are going out to the bar after work.”

      Me: “Cool, sounds like fun.”

      Coworkers: You coming?

      Me: Nope….I’m going to the gym (or going running).

I do like fun, my definition is just different and usually involves racing 8-24 hours through the night. However, I do like sunglasses that are stylish, functional and reasonably priced. Goodr hits a homerun in all three of these categories. While many people love the “lifestyle” aspect of a company (which I think most people will love Goodrs), I’m more concerned with practicality.


Overall: As an athlete do you really need sunglasses for training or racing? Yes, you do. Not wearing sunglasses means your face and eyes are tense/scrunched. You want to be relaxed in the rest of your body so you aren’t holding extra tension or wasting energy/effort. It’s the reason you often see elite marathon runners wearing sunglasses during their race.

Goodr does a great job with their glasses and they have locked me in as a fan. With so many styles and colors at such a reasonable price, I would add them to your purchase list as soon as possible. Some of their styles/colorways are limited edition (such as the “Not Your Grandma’s Couch” line and “The Empire Did Nothing Wrong” line) so you want to order them sooner rather than waiting for a far off birthday or holiday. For my Goodr glasses review, it’s an easy 5/5 stars.

MudGear Shorts Review

Posted by Strength & Speed on May 7, 2019 at 2:05 PM

If you know Obstacle Course Racing (OCR), then you know MudGear. The brand with the best known, best performing and most stylish OCR sock recently expanded their lineup of products to include shorts. I picked up a pair for use both in the gym, on the trail and on the race course and here is what I thought:


Style: I absolutely love the style. They currently offer two color options, black or grey. Both look great but I went with the black since it tends to go better with the rest of my OCR wardrobe. I love the MudGear logo along the sides since it allows me to represent the brand associated with OCR clothing without me having to lift up my pants to show off my socks.

Each pair of shorts has three pockets: the two normal side ones and one in the back. I love this because it brings out the shorts versatility. If I’m running errands, or not using them for training, the side pockets are great for holding things like my wallet or my phone. If I want to take them on a long run, the back pocket has a zipper closure allowing you to carry several gels to fuel your training as well as my house/car key.


Fit: I normally wear size medium in most things and usually buy my pants in around a 32 inch waist despite my actual waist being smaller (I like a little extra room). I actually own two pairs of the MudGear shorts, a small and a medium. I fit into both comfortably without issue. The drawstring closure system on each pair allows them to fit a wide range of waists. I suspect even if I packed on a little bit of off-season/winter/bulking weight the shorts would still fit great.

Personally, the only difference I could see between the small and medium is the mobility in the legs. The mediums allow me to take long deep lunges easily without adjusting my shorts. I found the smalls a little more restrictive requiring me to pull up my shorts slightly. So if you are between sizes, I would go with the larger or if you are concerned about leg mobility. That being said, I still wear and train in the small shorts but if going for a long run, I make sure to put on the mediums pair.


Durability: I’ve only had the shorts for a couple of months. So they’ve only got a limited number of miles and wear on them. That being said I did use them for OCRmill 24 (a 24 hour treadmill run doing four obstacles at the end of every mile) and they still look brand new. I had no chaffing from them despite long hours of repetitive movement. The built in lining still fits and feels great.

It is rare to find my low cut MudGear socks or shorts in my house in the clean pile because it is the first thing I grab out of the laundry. Even with weekly use for the last couple of months the shorts still look brand new. I’ve had other shorts that I put through similar wear and tear and sometimes the brand logo wears off quickly. So far, so good with MudGear.


Price: As I write this, they are currently on sale for $33 making them a great pair of shorts for their price that is comparable to other big fitness brands. As with everything in life, you “vote” with your money. When given a choice, I like to support the brands that support my sport…and no one does that more than MudGear.


Performance: I typically only wear spandex/compression material for races, so I haven’t had the full pleasure of racing in these shorts. However, I have taken them through some rainy trail runs that are comparable to OCRs. They wick away moisture well and don’t absorb water weight even when it is raining. If you aren’t a spandex type of guy, I would put these at the top of your list for racing. The built in liner, the pockets for fuel, the moisture wicking and the overall comfort give you everything you need.

With the addition of shorts, you can now race in full MudGear from head to toe including socks, shorts, shirt, sleeves and even a hat. (Don’t forget to check out their race jerseys, which are the perfect thickness in my opinion. Thin enough to allow for ventilation and coverage of skin but still providing protection without causing overheating.)


Overall Review: Overall, I love the MudGear shorts. They are versatile enough to wear around the house, out for a day with the family, training at the gym, going for a run or running through an OCR. When a brand is focused on your sport the products are better suited for your needs. You’ll see me in them after every race once I change out of my wet race clothing. Join the MudGear movement and pick up a pair of MudGear shorts today!

Now available at www.MudGear.com

5/5 Stars

MRG Ultra-OCR Bible is now digital!!!

Posted by Strength & Speed on April 21, 2019 at 10:30 PM

Mud Run Guide's Ultra-OCR Bible is now available on digital download for Kindle only.  If you want a hard copy, please head to the online S&S store.  If you want the digital download you can find it exclusively on Amazon via the link below.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07QZLZJFQ/ref=as_li_qf_asin_il_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=strspe-20&creative=9325&linkCode=as2&creativeASIN=B07QZLZJFQ&linkId=f20156249a0d2c89c57fcddca1e4b3fe



Gear Review: Atomik Balance

Posted by Strength & Speed on January 15, 2019 at 10:25 AM


Atomik Climbing Holds is a known leader in the world of Obstacle Course Racing (OCR) holds and climbing. However, they recently expanded their line of products to include balance products. As someone who previously had balance issues in OCR (2016s inclusion of Z beam at Conquer The Gauntlet Wichita knocked me back into the middle of the elite field), I was curious to see what they had to offer. Atomik has two different versions with several difficulty levels for each.


The two versions are:

1) Two footed version

2) Single foot version

The two footed version comes in three difficulty levels (Beginner, Intermediate and Advanced). The single foot version only comes in two difficulty versions (Beginner and Advanced). I decided to go with the two footed Beginner, two footed Advanced and the single foot advanced. Design: The design is simple but clever. A flat top and a bulge at the bottom make them look like an upside down Bosu ball.


Durability: Atomik always has amazing durability. I've had many of my holds for years and treat them very poorly often dropping them from heights when changing out the holds on my rig (something I don't recommend doing). However, even with my poor treatment I've never had one break or crack. These balance trainers are made out of the same high quality material and still look brand new despite frequent use at home and in a Conquer Fitness ninja competition.


Choices: Atomik offers their full line of colors to choose from with an almost overwhelming number of options. Seriously, take a look at these color choices. Use: While I got them for myself, the person in my house that loves them the most is my four year old daughter. She calls them lily pads (I got green versions) and we will spend an hour crossing them, walking in a circle or trying to change positions without falling. They are so much fun and you can tell your spouse you bought them for the kids. (You're welcome.) We also used them as part of the Conquer The Gauntlet Pro Team takeover at the December event. They provided a nice change of pace and something different to members of the gym. The balance required to cross helped test full body instead of just grip strength.


Overall: The advanced models I am going to give a 5/5 stars. I love the challenge they present and the single foot/two foot variation make for different challenges. I've seen people use other homemade products for balance that are similar but I have also seen people roll their ankles badly on those homemade or lower cost solutions. Despite hours of playtime on these Atomik balance trainers, I've never rolled my ankle. I want to say the design makes it impossible, but I feel like someone will take that as a challenge. Regardless, I can't figure out how you would roll an ankle on these trainers. The beginner model was great for kids, people with very poor balance or if you were going to do other exercises on the trainer besides just walking across it.


They would be a 5/5 stars but for most of the people who read my website, they are probably more of a 3.5/5 stars, because you will find them too easy. I didn't get to test the intermediate model but I suspect based off the beginner and advanced that it works pretty well. However, my recommendation is to go with the two footed advanced, single foot advanced and if you want some more options pickup more single foot advanced models or a two footed intermediate. Every year watching ninja warrior many of the top athletes get knocked out early because of balance obstacles. Balance is just like any other skill, if you don't practice you won't get better at it. I'm just glad we have companies like Atomik to help us to continue to push our limits.

Did you lose? Blame it on the booze. Race loss? Blame in on the sauce. Patron won't put you in the zone

Posted by Strength & Speed on January 7, 2019 at 6:05 AM

OCR has maintained the reputation of the party boy/girl lifestyle since the inception of the sport. And let’s face it, after a hard fought race who doesn’t want to celebrate with a few brews and good company in the festival area? Although the occasional post-race splurge is unlikely to dramatically affect performance, drinking in the days leading up to the race may be a concern. Research provided by the US Olympic Committee (USOC) indicates that binge drinking can decrease athletic performance by up to approximately 11.4% for up to 72 hours. This is particularly important for championship race series (example: OCR World Championships) that have three days of events or the ultra-endurance races (WTM, Toughest Mudder, Bonefrog Endurance, etc.) that last several hours. Alcohol consumption can affect performance through many mechanisms which include:


● Diminished motor skills, balance, coordination, and reaction time

● Poor circulation to muscle tissue and significant reduced strength/power output

● Increased risk of injury in athletes who drink vs those who do not

● Impaired use of carbohydrate and fat for exercise

● Increased rate of perceived exertion during exercise

● Imbalances of testosterone and estrogen which may contribute to a less than ideal body composition

● Disruption in sleep cycles which can inhibit physical and cognitive recovery from exercise

● Fluid losses and imbalanced electrolytes through diuretic effects

● Increased energy intake from nutritionally sparse sources that include the alcoholic beverages themselves and associated poor dietary choices while inebriated


How much is too much? Binge drinking is categorized as more than two alcoholic beverages per two hours. But how much is considered “one” drink? Generally, one drink is 12 ounces of a beer/cider/cooler with 5% alcohol content, 5 ounces of wine with 12% alcohol content, or 1.5 ounces of liquor with 40% alcohol content. Regardless athletes are encouraged to restrict their daily alcohol consumption to <2 drinks per day and it would be optimal to omit regular alcohol use.


Diagram and content courtesy of the USOC Sport Nutrition Team


With all of this being said, if you are an individual who races in open heats or non-competitively with no goals other than to finish a race -- a couple of drinks with your buddies the night before isn’t going to make a large impact….. BUT if you are A.) An athlete who takes performance seriously or B.) Racing a more demanding event (multiple day series or ultra-endurance race) it is highly advisable to avoid alcohol consumption at least 48 hours prior to competition.


---------------------------------------

Luc is a registered dietitian with his M.S. in Nutrition and certifications in personal training and wellness coaching. Luc hones his professional skills through counseling athletes/fitness enthusiasts and through his career as a clinical dietitian at East Carolina University. As a member of the Strength & Speed Development Team, his main hobby is competitive obstacle course racing with notable appearances at Obstacle Racing World Championships (2014-16) and a 50 mile completion at Worlds Toughest Mudder 2013. Luc can be followed through his facebook (www.facebook.com/lrlabonte) and Instagram (www.instagram.com/lrlabonte_ms_rd_ld/) accounts.

 

4th S&S Development Team Window Now Open

Posted by Strength & Speed on December 6, 2018 at 8:05 PM


Strength & Speed is opening the application window for their 4th S&S Developtment Team. Each year has brought success to our athletes with a list of different benefits that change but also expand slightly every year.  2018 included athletes getting their first sponsors, several becoming ambassadors for brands and many hitting new PRs including first Ultra-OCR win, first win, first cash podium, most podiums in a year and more. To check out some of the athletes from the last three years, check out the Teams page.

 

Unlike Pro Teams which often provide larger benefits like free access into races spanning multiple states and other perks, the biggest benefit of this team is access to knowledge for improvement not published elsewhere. Upon entrance into the team you will have small group access to personal trainers, a nutritionist, physical therapist, OCR professionals and other sponsored athletes. As part of the Development Team, you will get unprecedented access to knowledge includes training information, workout templates and guidance when applying for sponsorship.


Additional benefits of the team include name/S&S score on the website, a couple of items of free apparel, marketing support, discounts not available to non-team members and the opportunity to expand you influence in the OCR world. As S&S gets perks they are allowed to share, those discounts, free items and free entries are passed along to the team. Companies want athletes that not only provide them quality finishing results but also have an outlet for spreading their message. Being a part of Strength & Speed gives you an established platform to spread your desired message to a larger audience rather than trying to build something on your own from the ground up.

 

Getting sponsored by a larger company is not an easy task and it requires significant work. The athletes at Strength & Speed have already solved a lot of the challenges associated with this process. If you do not need training advice but just knowledge on how to get sponsored, the Development Team will also help you with that.

 

Apply today by filling out the information below and sending it to Evan@TeamStrengthSpeed.com as AN ATTACHED WORD DOCUMENT if you are interested. We are not necessarily looking for the best athletes, just those with a strong desire to succeed. Application window closes on January 15, 2019:

(Cut and paste the below into a word document and fill out) 

Name: 

Is this your first year applying?: 

Major Goal for 2019: 

Minor Goals for 2019:

Races for 2019: 

2018 Race Results: 

Race Highlights from 2017 or Earlier:

Social Media Sites (Facebook/Twitter/Instagram/YouTube/etc.):

Other Relevant Information You Think We Should Know:

Other Sponsors (if applicable):

Possible Interests in Expanding Influence (interested in writing articles, reviews, videos or other ideas?):

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